Reggie and Arthur

Getting ready to submit another story to the Saints and Sinners literary conference. I’ve made it to the top 25, but not the top ten for the past three years. I’m hoping to make it to the top ten this year. I’m working on a story about Reggie and Arthur, two BFFs with a shot at long-term love.

Here’s the opening.

 

 

 

Reggie leaned back in his chair, pushing down on Adam’s head. The young man’s mouth was wet and greedy on Reggie’s cock and Reggie wasn’t far from losing it. He twisted his fingers into Adam’s mop of shaggy blond hair, enjoying the soft feel of the curls in his big hands. Adam looked like a stereotypical surfer dude with long, lean muscles and his soft, long hair. Reggie met him back in October, shortly after Adam had moved to Phoenix from California to go to grad school at ASU. Life in the desert didn’t slow the surfer’s roll down in the least. He had simply switched to rock climbing, hiking, mountain biking, and surprisingly, golf.

Reggie smiled. He had a sexy young man sucking his dick and here he was lost in thought about outdoor sports. He pressed his fingers against Adam’s head, groaning a bit as the man’s tongue flicked along the underside of Reggie’s cock. Rocking his hips up, he let the natural rhythm of Adam’s mouth wash over him. He clenched his stomach muscles as a sharp ripple of longing spread from his balls to his stomach.

Adam looked coyly up at Reggie and at the last minute, lifted his mouth and wrapped his hand around Reggie’s cock, squeezing and pulling it until Reggie came in his hand.

“Someday you’re going to swallow it,” Reggie said.

“I never swallow,” Adam said, pursing his lips.

He looked so like an old lady at that moment, Reggie couldn’t help but laugh. Adam stood up and reached for a towel. He wiped off his hand and threw the towel toward the laundry bin. “I’ve gotta go wash up.”

“Hey, wait,” Reggie said, reaching for Adam’s arm. “I’ve got something you might want.”

Adam didn’t pause on his way to the bathroom. “I can’t. I have a nine o’clock tee time.”

Reggie looked away, the good mood from his orgasm vanishing rapidly. “Are you going with John?”

Adam answered by shutting the bathroom door. Reggie heard the shower go on. Half-tempted to slip into the shower with Adam, he stood up. At the bathroom door, he hesitated. Adam wasn’t a cuddly kind of guy and he had made it clear that he was in a hurry. Turning away from the door, he walked naked into the kitchen and quickly ate a hard-boiled egg.

His picked up his phone. Arthur had called. Reggie grinned. Arthur was so old school, he didn’t even have texting on his phone. His flip phone. Reggie chuckled and dialed his best friend’s number.

“Hi Reggie.” Arthur sounded happy to hear from him.

“Hey.” Reggie could feel the smile spreading across his face. “I didn’t listen to your voicemail.”

“Of course you didn’t,” Arthur said. “I don’t know why I continue to leave them.”

“Because someday you’ll be dead and all I’ll have left of you will be fifty-thousand voicemails asking me why I never answer my phone.”

Arthur laughed and Reggie’s chest swelled with happiness. Arthur had been Reggie’s best friend for almost thirty years. It was comforting growing old with someone who was doing the same. Not that Reggie looked old, he reminded himself.

“That’s a lovely thought,” Arthur replied. “It will be a literary tour de force. Instead of the letters of Reggie Jonas and Arthur Kurtz, we’ll have the voicemails. Too bad I don’t text, at least you’d have something in print to save for posterity.”

“I doubt anyone is interested in our posteriors,” Reggie joked.

“Don’t be too sure,” Arthur said. “I’m an academic. If I make a breakthrough and then die in a tragic, yet sensational way, you’ll be set for life.”

Reggie shook his head. “I don’t even like thinking that way.” He paused. “What will I leave the world? My biography will be called The Big, Black, and Beautiful Boy Toy.”

“You aren’t a boy toy anymore, my friend, but you are certainly beautiful.”

Reggie smiled. “What’s going on?”

“I have no appointments after one today, and I thought I might tempt you into lunch at that new vegetarian restaurant in Scottsdale.”

“I’m always tempted to go out with you,” Reggie said. “Shall I pick you up on campus?”

“One o’clock,” Arthur said. “Don’t be late.” He hung up.

Reggie laughed again as Adam came into the kitchen. “What’s so funny?”

“Arthur,” Reggie said.

Adam grimaced. “I don’t know why you hang out with him. He’s so old and boring.”

Reggie frowned. “He’s not boring and he’s the same age as me.”

Adam sidled close to Reggie, breathing softly against his face. Reggie’s cock stirred and Adam noticed. He looked down and smiled. “Too bad I have to go,” Adam said. He turned abruptly.

“How about a kiss goodbye?” Reggie said. His voice sounded plaintive to his own ears and he tried to force it into a more casual tone. “Hey, get over here and kiss me goodbye.”

Adam waved over his shoulder. “Can’t. Late. I took fifty out of your wallet, by the way. The guys want to go to lunch after the game.”

He slammed out the door leaving Reggie staring after him in disgust. When did Adam get the idea that he could just take money from Reggie’s wallet? He strode into the bedroom and picked up his wallet. Counting the money, he sighed. Adam had taken two fifties and a twenty. Reggie carried a lot of cash, but he always knew exactly how much he had.

Coyote Ate the Stars

My one self-published book, Coyote Ate the Stars, won the Writer’s Digest First Place in Fantasy, self-published book award. Since I’m almost done with the sequel, I have the original on sale over at Amazon for only 99 cents for the ebook.

 

If you’ve been wanting to check it out and you were waiting for a good price, now is the time!

Author To-Do List

Writing isn’t just about words.

I saw a meme the other day that said something like “Being an adult is telling yourself ‘But after this week, things will slow down a bit’ until you die.”

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Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

It was the perfect moment for a laugh/cry reaction. Because it’s so true. Today, I was sitting down with my wife to work out our schedules for the rest of the month. THE MONTH. When did I become this person who writes out a monthly schedule? I used to not know what I was doing in five minutes. I was the queen of spontaneity.

Now I have even the act of doing the dishes and taking the dog for a walk written into my half hour increments for the NEXT MONTH.

 

I put the blame partially on being a writer and partially on not knowing WTF I’m doing some of the time.

I’m a college instructor, so of course grading and lessons plans take some of my time. I’m a grad student, so homework gets a little time. I run an online writing academy, so that gets some of my time. I’m married with a house and a cat and a geriatric dog who gets shots twice a day for diabetes. So there’s that.
cropped-beth-cover-photo.pngBut it’s the writing that really eats my time. Not the ACTUAL words, mind you. The stuff that goes around the writing. And I’ve been failing miserably at it.

A month in the life of an author might consist of:

Put some words on a work in progress.

Follow #writingcommunity and other hashtags on Twitter to connect with other writers

Post things to author Facebook page

Create graphics on Canva or whatever to post on the page

Research which/if any ads work to promote one’s work.

Put out frantic calls for beta readers on social media.

Find beta readers.

Complete revisions on the finished work based on first beta reader feedback.

Send work to second beta reader.

Send out query letters on the completed work.

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Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

Wait interminably for response.

Keep track of short story submissions.

Write short stories for submissions.

Send out a newsletter. (I haven’t done this in months)

Try to up the newsletter subscriptions in the hope that I actually put out a regular newsletter one day.

Write a blog on a regular basis.

Fail miserably at writing a blog on a regular basis.

Brainstorm ideas for the next story.

Decide which of three works in progress has the best chance of getting finished in the next year and work on that one.

Change mind the next day and work on different novel.

Learn how to embed gifs in my blog posts.

Set up promotions/sales on already published works in hopes of generating some sales.

Keep writing/posting interesting and compelling pieces of work to Patreon to keep your few Patrons amused, entertained, and happy.

Post snippets of Patreon posts to social media in hopes of garnering more patrons.

Read books to stimulate author brain.

Have extreme happiness about that one big award.

Have period of extreme self-doubt that it will be the only one for life.

Research writing contests and try to determine which ones are legit.

Go through backlog of unpublished work to see if any is salvageable.

Try to learn how to play “Love Me Do” on the harmonica.


 

That’s it. That’s August in a nutshell. And September. And October. And…

In keeping with my monthly planner, I sat down to write a blog today about writing and instead it came out as all the things I do instead of writing.

I think there would be a market for a person who knows how to do all of these things, who will do them all, and who will take their pay in a percentage of the increase in royalties after the marketing. Some magical fairy godmother of writers who waves a magic wand and makes all the businessy stuff go away.

 

In the meantime, hey, I wrote a blog this month! Stay tuned until December when I bust out my next monthly blog. cropped-beth-patreon-flier.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Author Spotlight on Jody Klaire

GCLS Writing Academy

jkferb2 Jody (right) with Ferb

First, a disclaimer. I’m a huge fan of Jody Klaire, both as a person and as a writer. She is immensely talented in a lot of different ways. I sat down to talk about her time with the Writing Academy and about some of her recent work.

Let’s jump right in with your book La Vie En Bleu. I might be a little biased because this was your Writing Academy book, but I just love this adorable romance. Pippa is such an amazing, albeit flighty character and the story is so charming and sweet. Can you talk a bit about your process writing this book?

I’m delighted you’re biased! La Vie En Bleu was my first romantic comedy. I spent time on holiday (on vacation) in Provence growing up and studied French (and French culture and people) as an adult. I wanted the book to…

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Sacchi Green Blog Tour – Sex Scenes Without Fear

I have to admit I was pretty excited to be asked to host a stopover on Sacchi Green’s Wild Rides Blog Tour. After all, Sacchi is famous for writing and curating incredibly intense, hot, fiery, edge-of-your-seat erotica. And I’m famous for—Well, closing the doors and giving my characters a little privacy. Still, I think hot lesbian erotica is an important part of the lesfic world and I will always celebrate those who do it well.

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You can enter to win a free ebook or some other cool stuff at our Rafflecopter giveaway HERE.

Without further ado, please welcome the inimitable Sacchi Green.


 

I’ve been kindly invited to blog here on the occasion of the Dirt Road Books publication of Wild Rides and other Lesbian Erotic Adventures, a collection of my own stories. I’ve edited about fifteen anthologies consisting mostly of work by other writers, but I’ve also been writing for other folks’ anthologies, and the chance to have some of my own grouped all together in one book is a huge treat for me.

 

But I’m not going to talk much today about the book itself. In my years of writing and editing I’ve been dedicated to making a case for erotica as a potentially worthwhile sub-genre. I’ve done panels at various conventions on how to write sex scenes, and pontificated on the subject in online groups, so in spite of the fact that you wouldn’t be reading this at all if you weren’t already at least tolerant of erotica, I’ll share part of a chapter I wrote for a friend’s now out-of-print book.

 

Sex Scenes Without Fear

What is it about sex scenes? No other section of a book other than, possibly, the ending, inspires so much flipping through the pages. Some readers will be avid to find the “good parts” and devour them first, while others will want to make sure they know which pages to avoid. It’s equally true that some writers can’t wait to get working on the erotic bits, while others, pressured to include them by editors or by their own assessments of the market, avoid writing them until everything else has been done and they can’t procrastinate any longer.

I won’t try to tell you, as a writer, that whatever method you use is wrong. If you can make it work, that’s great. But I will tell you what kind of reader you should write for: one who opens herself to your characters, gets drawn into their lives and emotions, and follows wherever the story leads because it’s so compelling that she can’t bear to miss a word. Not even words she might usually avoid.

Your first responsibility is to give this reader what she needs. Being true to your characters is just as essential, but you’ve seduced the reader into some degree of identification with your POV character, so it amounts to the same thing. And what she needs, besides an emotional bond that intensifies into a physical one, is a scene that flows naturally from what comes before and advances the characterization and story arc at least as much as any other element of the work.

Sex scenes serve many purposes beyond satisfying an editor who believes that they sell books. Erotic interchanges can be as revelatory of character as any other basic human activity, and more so than most, since they deal with heightened emotions and senses and, in some cases, heavily weighted baggage from past experience. If you’ve already developed your characters fully, aspects of their personalities and histories can be emphasized in sex scenes, but you may also find that these scenes provide ways to slip in details not revealed in calmer moments. Shyness or confidence, impulsiveness or self-control, tenderness, vulnerability, repression, unapologetic sensuality; these are only a few of the traits that can be surface in the heat of a sexual encounter. The characters may even surprise themselves with their own reactions.

The sex scene can also serve less complex purposes. Sometimes your characters (and the reader) just need to have a really good time, whether as a counterpoint to the stresses of whatever else is happening in your story or as a pacing device to vary the mood from scene to scene. And eventually you have to deliver the implicitly promised payoff to all the emotional and erotic tension you’ve been building.

You have been building erotic tension, haven’t you? It’s a huge mistake to think of a sex scene as a single obligatory lump of action inserted into your story with no relevance to the rest, sticking out like a sore thumb. (Yes, that’s an unforgivable cliché. Yes, I could think of several metaphors more in keeping with our topic, but I’ll leave those as an exercise for the reader.)

When it comes to building toward sex scenes, foreshadowing is like foreplay. It’s not going to be convincing for your characters to leap suddenly into a passionate clinch without ever having given hints, in thought or deed, of a growing sexual attraction. Even if your plot involves repression or denial, you need to find subtle ways of showing that something is simmering under the surface. The reader, as well as the characters, has to be ready for an eruption. In a novel that isn’t specifically erotica you don’t want to overdo the sensual foreshadowing to the point of distraction from the other essential elements, but it does need to be part of the blend.

So now your characters, setting, and emotional connection with your reader have been established. You’ve drawn on all or most of the senses, using sight, hearing, scent, touch, and taste wherever they might be appropriate. Erotic tension has mounted, and you’ve reached the point when a sex scene is the natural next step in the progression of their relationship (and your story). Many writers, as well as readers, would prefer to leave the rest to the imagination, but if you’re reading this we’ll assume that for one reason or another—editorial pressure, personal inclination, recognition of the importance to the story as a whole—you intend to create a fully developed and explicit sexual encounter.

Just how explicit is explicit enough? I used to say, when asked, that a story crosses the line into erotica when the writer has to make decisions about what terms to use for parts of the body. It was a stupid answer. It’s quite possible (and an intriguing challenge) to write intensely arousing and satisfying scenes without naming body parts at all. Anyone reading your work is likely to be familiar with the anatomical territory, and will understand what’s going on from the context and the reactions and dialogue of the characters (assuming that “Yes, there, please, right there,” counts as dialogue).

Nevertheless, the language you use to describe sex can have nearly as much impact on the reader as the actions you’re describing. For better or for worse, sex has accumulated so much baggage in our culture that “dirty” words carry an erotic jolt of their own, positive for some people, negative for others. All you can do is be familiar enough with your characters to know whether they’d say “pussy” or “vulva”; “clit” or “clitoris”; “labia” or “lips”, or…well, you get the picture. Even the choice between “breasts” or “tits” or “boobs” says something about the character’s personality, background, and mood.  “Tits” is a perfectly good colloquial version of “teats”, a term currently more in use in animal husbandry, but these days “tits” has a certain edge to it that might or might not be what you’re looking for. “Boobs” feels to me like a more casual, flippant usage, which can have its place as well. Just be glad that in lesbian fiction we don’t have to deal with labels for male genitalia, unless in a metaphorical sense, but really, let’s not go there.

My advice, from the perspective of just one reader/writer/editor, is to get as much mileage as you can out of non-controversial terms, and then use the others, but sparingly. Hands, fingers, tongues, thighs; few descriptions are more erotic than getting any of the first three moving between a pair of the fourth. When the focus inevitably becomes so narrowed that you do need more specific (or “explicit”) language, keep it short and non-clinical.

The one time above all others when you don’t want to throw the reader out of the scene (or have the book thrown against the wall) is in the full heat of a sexual encounter. Or a good fuck, if you prefer blunt to stilted. If you’re going to try your hand at new ways to describe, say, hardened nipples, you might come up with something creative and right to the point, but you’d better run it by an unbiased beta reader or two. (Acorns and berries and snails and pencil erasers have already been used, just so you know.) I’m not saying that you should never be creative, but you need to be aware of the hazards. All of the other advice you’ve seen about keeping adverbs and adjectives to a minimum applies here, as well, and ellipses, especially tempting in erotica since so much reaction is non-verbal, need just as firm a hand.

Another word-choice issue, one inherent in same-sex erotica, is the problem of pronouns. Which “she” is touching which “her” with whose hand? A first person point of view takes care of the problem with “I” and “She, but deciding what kind of POV works best for a story should be based on other factors.

So what can you do? Ideally the context, the individualized personalities of the characters, and their relative positions at a given time (if one is standing and the other is sitting, we know who’s reaching down and who’s looking up), will make some of the interactions clear. When these aren’t enough, don’t be afraid to use their names, even if it seems repetitive. Don’t give in to the urge to use too many adjectives, at least not in the form of “the darker woman” or “the whimpering girl”; these distance the reader from the action at just the worst time. This doesn’t mean that you can’t get away with some physical descriptions to indicate who’s doing what—“dark hair brushed her skin”, “her large hand moved faster”—but don’t rely on them too often. When you need to use a name for clarity, do it. If you’re handling the rest of the scene well enough, the reader will be too involved to notice.

This brings us to writing the scene itself. “Focus” is the key word. Focus on what your characters are feeling. People read for the sensations it arouses. The stimulation might be intellectual, or something along the lines of sense-of-wonder, but far more often they’re looking for an emotional and sensual charge, something that stirs the body as well as the mind. A romantic scene can do this as well as an erotic one for many readers. There’s a physical reaction; the heart seems to swell, the pulse quickens, the face may flush, there may even be a hint of tears. It’s no accident that something with emotional appeal is often termed “touching”. Taking it to the next, erotic, level should build on this physical response, extend it to more areas of the body, and intensify it.

There’s no single required structure for a sex scene. For one thing, the scene doesn’t stand alone, unless it constitutes the entirety of a short story. You may have got your characters (and the reader) so worked up that they go right at it the moment they’ve made it to a private corner, or the tone may not even be overtly erotic at the beginning, until some catalyst triggers a reaction that becomes an irresistible force. You’ve been leading up to this, building erotic tension at various strategic points, sometimes subtly, sometimes with more emphasis. You may have established a pattern this way that echoes the overall structure of the plot, but by the time you reach the “real” sex scene the flow should be almost entirely forward. There can be exceptions; your plan for character development might call for one or another of the lovers to show hesitation, or experience painful flashbacks, or something along those lines; but your ultimate goal is an uninterrupted stretch of accelerating heat that comes to a satisfying conclusion. You don’t necessarily want to reach that point too fast, though–getting there is a whole lot of the fun. Wild Rides promo.2.2 (1)

Don’t feel that you have to include acts that you actually find distasteful. If, for instance, the thought of using teeth on tender parts makes you cringe (and assuming that cringing is not something you enjoy on any level), or feather-stroking strikes you as merely annoying, don’t use them. There are plenty of other options. A scene where everyone remains fully clothed and the major friction comes from thighs pressing into crotches can be as erotic as naked slippery bodies performing complex contortions. You just have to do a good enough job of showing how intensely the participants are enjoying it to convince the reader and take her along for the ride. Focus on the feelings.

But what do editors look for? Don’t they require a certain amount of explicit language and hotter-than-life sex? Probably most do, but they value the story component too. I’ve edited over a dozen erotica anthologies, and I’ve never consciously established any kind of quota for sexual content. Well, if it’s an erotica anthology, there should be sexual tension, and someone, at some point, should reach orgasm, although even that isn’t always necessary. Sex has to be a significant part of the story, but it needs to have a good story around it, and I especially like it when even the sex is about more than sex.

That’s really all I can tell you in general terms about writing sex scenes. Create characters, setting, plot, and sensory details that will draw the reader into the story, and when a sex scene is the natural next step, focus on feelings. Develop it just as you would in any other part of the story, but even more so, because there really is something special about sex scenes.

 

Have I followed my own advice in the stories in Wild Rides? I really don’t know, so feel free to let me know where I’ve gone wrong.

 

Upcoming stops on the Sacchi Green blog tour:

3/27 — Women and Words
3/28 —  Cheyenne Blue

Previous stops:

3/19 — Sacchi Green
3/20 — KD Williamson
3/21 — Annette Mori
3/22 — Andi Marquette

3/25 — R.G. Emmanuelle 

 


Sacchi Green is a Lambda Award-winning writer and editor of erotica and other stimulating genres. She lives in western Massachusetts, with an alternate retreat in the mountains of New Hampshire and occasional forays into such real world spots as NYC for readings. Her work has appeared in scores of publications, including multiple volumes of Best Lesbian Erotica, Best Women’s Erotica, Best Transgender Erotica, and Best Fantasy Erotica, and she’s also edited seventeen anthologies over the last fourteen years, most of them lesbian erotica. Nine have been finalists for Lambda Literary Awards, and two of those have been Lambda winners, while four have won Golden Crown Literary Society awards. All these awards, of course, are actually due to the fine writers who trust her with their work.

 

Sacchi has most recently edited Best Lesbian Erotica of the Year 20th Anniversary Edition, Best Lesbian Erotica of the Year Volume 2 and Volume 3, and, possibly the most fun of all, Witches, Princesses and Women at Arms: Erotic Lesbian Fairy Tales. Her very first novel is Shadow Hand, a superheroine book that puts a new twist on the genre, and her newest publication is a collection of her own short stories, Wild Rides and Other Lesbian Erotic Adventures, from Dirt Road Books. You can find her online at: https://www.facebook.com/sacchi.green and http://sacchi-green.blogspot.com, and contact her at sacchigreen@gmail.com.

Announcing…

The Writer’s Digest Self-Published Book Award Winners were announced today. I can’t tell you how thrilling it is to see my book on this list of amazing books.

Coyote Ate the Stars won first place in the fantasy category. It’s a special book to me – Coyote is the character who has been living in my soul for over a decade. I tried to force him into so many different stories, but he refused to fit into any of them. Finally, one day, it clicked and I wrote the whole book during NaNoWriMo 2017.

Check out all of the award winners!

https://www.writersdigest.com/online-exclusives/writers-digest-may-june-2019/announcing-the-6th-annual-self-published-e-book-awards-winners?fbclid=IwAR0CxdNJPP_8Spe08rHNnv2bLQJhiofKM-OZp8msHKP9Br05MsLIJIGb39k

Interview with the Writer’s Digest award winning author, Beth Burnett

This was such a fun interview. Tammy Bird is charming and gracious and she managed to make me spill some of my super secrets.

Tammy Bird's Nitty Gritty Writer's Nook

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Several years ago, at a GCLS conference far, far away, I had the pleasure of meeting one of the coolest women ever.

I was a con virgin, and she was a one woman welcome committee.

She wasn’t actually the only person making people feel welcome. In fact, the conference is one of the most welcoming I have ever attended. However, every time I felt overwhelmed and ready to run to my room and hide, there she was.

It is like her super power.

Today I got to talk to Writer’s Digest Award winning author, Beth Burnett, on a more intimate level.

I am excited to share our conversation with all of you.

Let’s talk Coyote

Coyote Ate the Stars, which is a bad ass title, by the way, was released in 2018. This fantasy novel set in two worlds is unlike your previous novels. Can you share a little bit…

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